American Association of State Compensation insurance Fund
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CopperPoint Mutual Insurance Company
Phone: (602) 631-2000
Address: 3030 North Third Street
Phoenix, AZ   85012
Website: www.copperpoint.com

State Compensation Insurance Fund
Phone: 888-STATEFUNDCA
Address: 333 Bush Street
Suite 800
San Francisco, CA   94104
Website: www.statefundca.com

Pinnacol Assurance
Phone: (303) 361-4000
Address: 7501 East Lowry Boulevard
Suite 800
Denver, CO   80230-7006
Website: www.pinnacol.com

Hawaii Employers' Mutual Insurance Co. Inc.
Phone: (808) 524-3642
Address: 1100 Alakea Street
Suite 1400
Honolulu, HI   96813
Website: www.hemic.com

Idaho State Insurance Fund
Phone: (208) 332-2100
Address: 1215 West State Street
P.O. Box 83720
Boise, ID   83720-0044
Website: www.idahosif.org

Kentucky Employers Mutual Insurance
Phone: (859) 425-7800
Address: 250 West Main Street Suite 900
P.O. Box 83720
Lexington, KY   40507-1724
Website: www.kemi.com

Louisiana Workers' Compensation Corporation
Phone: (225) 924-7788
Address: 2237 South Acadian Thruway
P.O. Box 83720
Baton Rouge, LA   70808
Website: www.lwcc.com

Maine Employers Mutual Insurance Company (MEMIC)
Phone: (207) 791-3300
Address: 261 Commercial Street
P.O. Box 11409
Portland, ME   04104
Website: www.memic.com

Chesapeake Employers’ Insurance Company
Phone: (410) 494-2000
Address: 8722 Loch Raven Boulevard
P.O. Box 11409
Towson, MD   21286-2235
Website: www.ceiwc.com

SFM Mutual Insurance Company
Phone: (952) 838-4200
Address: 3500 American Boulevard West Suite 700
P.O. Box 11409
Bloomington, MN   55431-4434
Website: www.sfmic.com

Missouri Employers Mutual Insurance
Phone: (800) 442-0590
Address: 101 N Keene St
P.O. Box 11409
Columbia, MO   65201
Website: www.mem-ins.com

Montana State Fund
Phone: (406) 495-5015
Address: 855 Front Street
P.O. Box 4759
Helena, MT   59604-4759
Website: www.montanastatefund.com

New Mexico Mutual Group
Phone: (505) 345-7260
Address: 3900 Singer Boulevard NE
P.O. Box 4759
Albuquerque, NM   87109
Website: www.newmexicomutual.com

New York State Insurance Fund
Phone: (212) 312-7001
Address: 199 Church Street
P.O. Box 4759
New York, NY   10007
Website: www.nysif.com

Workforce Safety and Insurance
Phone: (701) 328-3800
Address: 1600 East Century Avenue Suite 1
P.O. Box 4759
Bismarck, ND   58506-5585
Website: www.WorkforceSafety.com

Ohio Bureau of Workers Compensation
Phone: (800) 644-6292
Address: 30 West Spring Street
P.O. Box 4759
Columbus, OH   43215-2256
Website: www.ohiobwc.com

CompSource Mutual Insurance Company
Phone: (405) 232-7663
Address: 1901 North Walnut Ave.
P.O. Box 53505
Oklahoma City, OK   73152-3505
Website: www.compsourcemutual.com

State Accident Insurance Fund (SAIF)
Phone: (503) 373-8000
Address: 400 High Street SE
P.O. Box 53505
Salem, OR   97312-1000
Website: www.saif.com

Pennsylvania State Workers Insurance Fund
Phone: (570) 963-4635
Address: 100 Lackawanna Avenue
P.O. Box 5100
Scranton, PA   18505-5100
Website: www.dli.state.pa.us/swif

Beacon Mutual Insurance Company
Phone: (401) 825-2667
Address: One Beacon Centre
P.O. Box 5100
Warwick, RI   02886-1378
Website: www.beaconmutual.com

South Carolina State Accident Fund
Phone: (803) 896-5800
Address: P.O. Box 102100
P.O. Box 5100
Columbia, SC   29221-5000
Website: www.saf.sc.gov

Texas Mutual Insurance Company
Phone: (800) 859-5995
Address: 6210 East Highway 290
P.O. Box 5100
Austin, TX   78723-1098
Website: www.texasmutual.com

Workers Compensation Fund
Phone: (800) 446-2667
Address: 100 West Towne Ridge Parkway
P.O. Box 2227
Sandy, UT   84070
Website: www.wcfgroup.com

Washington Department of Labor and Industries
Phone: (360) 902-5800
Address: P.O. Box 44001
P.O. Box 2227
Olympia, WA   98504-4001
Website: www.lni.wa.gov

Wyoming Division of Workers Safety & Compensation
Phone: (307) 777-7159
Address: Cheyenne Business Center
1510 East Pershing Boulevard
Cheyenne, WY   82002
Website: wydoe.state.wy.us

Workers Compensation Board - Alberta
Phone: (780) 498-3999
Address: 9925-107 Street
P.O. Box 2415
Edmonton, AB   T5J 2S5
Website: www.wcb.ab.ca

Workers Compensation Board of British Columbia (WORKSAFEBC)
Phone: (604) 273-2266
Address: P.O. Box 5350 Station Terminal
P.O. Box 2415
Vancouver, BC   V6B 5L5
Website: www.worksafebc.com

Manitoba Workers Compensation Board
Phone: (204) 954-4321
Address: 333 Broadway
P.O. Box 2415
Winnipeg, MB   R3C 4W3
Website: www.wcb.mb.ca

WorkSafeNB
Phone: (506) 632-2200
Address: 1 Portland Street
P.O. Box 160
Saint John, NB   E2L 3X9
Website: www.worksafenb.ca

Workers Compensation Board of Nova Scotia
Phone: (902) 491-8999
Address: 5668 South Street
P.O. Box 1150
Halifax, NS   B3J 2Y2
Website: www.wcb.ns.ca

Prince Edward Island Workers Compensation Board
Phone: (902) 368-5680
Address: 14 Weymouth Street
P.O. Box 1150
Charlottetown, PE   C1A 7L7
Website: www.wcb.pe.ca

Saskatchewan Workers Compensation Board
Phone: (306) 787-4370
Address: 200 - 1881 Scarth Street
P.O. Box 1150
Regina, SK   S4P 4L1
Website: www.wcbsask.com

Puerto Rico State Insurance Fund Corporation
Phone: (787) 793-5959
Address: G.P.O. Box 365028
P.O. Box 1150
San Juan, PR   00936-5028
Website: www.cfse.gov.pr
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Latest Newsletter

Driverless Vehicles—Rapid Changes Ahead

By Kendra DePaul, Ohio BWC

Transportation-related incidents continue to be the leading cause of fatal workers’ compensation injuries. So the buzz about autonomous vehicles has caught the attention of the industry. The hope is that by automating certain functions of vehicles, human error can be eliminated and safety improved.

There are different levels of automation, ranging from low levels of driver assistance, such as cruise control, to partial automation, where humans cede control under certain condition, to fully autonomous, self-driving vehicles. Although there are companies currently piloting self-driving vehicles, experts say we are still years away from fully autonomous vehicles. However, partial automation is being developed rapidly and is likely a short-term reality due to increased investment in research from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), auto manufacturers, and individual states.

Although the possibility of improving safety is exciting, those in the workers’ compensation world need to be thoughtful about how the changes in innovation will affect how they do business in both the short and long term. Specifically from an underwriting perspective, considerations will have to be made about evaluating the risk of transportation companies in an ever- changing technology landscape.

One of the first questions on everyone’s mind is “how do we know when autonomous vehicles are safe enough to become mainstream?” Companies have been testing and retesting concept vehicles, but the real difficulty is anticipating every situation a vehicle may encounter. Arda Kurt, research scientist for the Center of Automotive Research at The Ohio State University, explained that “the real challenge is figuring out how to program the vehicle for the unexpected situation.” Developing an autonomous vehicle to travel on a highway is something technology can handle, but when you throw in unexpected obstacles such as an animal or road construction, that is where testing still needs to be done. He also explained that research is still being conducted on how consumer usage will affect injuries. “When people don’t have to actually be driving, they may position themselves differently in the car. We are still researching how to mitigate risk if people are slouching to one side,” he said.

As these developments continue, underwriting departments are going to have to determine how they are going to assess the risk associated with employers using autonomous vehicles. It is still unclear how underwriters will determine which automated components actually lead to fewer accidents, or how to evaluate employer safety protocols to ensure the vehicles are being used as intended. As the technology for automation continues, the underwriting strategy will have to follow closely behind to ensure risks are adequately accounted for.

Another topic of discussion has to do with liability. There are many questions about liability if an autonomous vehicle crashes. Currently, a human is still required to pay attention in a car, but there will surely be questions about product liability when crashes occur. A publication titled Self-Driving Cars and Insurance by the Insurance Information Institute (III) explained that insurers will have to determine “whether the accidents that do occur lead to a higher percentage of product liability claims, as claimants blame the manufacturer or supplier for what went wrong rather than their own behavior.” It also mentions the possible need for liability laws to evolve to account for these situations.

Although autonomous vehicles should not affect claim compensability, insurers will have to consider how to address subrogation for workers’ compensation claims occurring in autonomous vehicles. If liability laws change to encourage the use of autonomous vehicles, workers’ compensation carriers will have to stay engaged and advocate for their right to recover claims costs caused by a third party. And if laws are passed that do not allow recovery, underwriting and risk control departments will be tasked to find ways to reduce the risk associated with these types of claims.

Perhaps the biggest question that remains for underwriters is how technological innovation will change the transportation industry and the occupations therein. Today, there are millions of truck drivers on the roads, delivering the products we consume. Currently their jobs are pretty straightforward; they pick up freight in one location, drive to the destination, and unload the freight. Their occupation, and the risk associated with it is somewhat defined. However, we may be on the cusp of technology that could radically change what the truck driver occupation looks like. Companies are beginning to experiment with “platooning,” where two tractor trailers follow each other closely to approve fuel efficiency. This arrangement is possible because technology allows the vehicles to talk to each other, so the second truck knows when to change speed or break. Currently, a truck driver is required to be present in both vehicles, but some are predicting that it is only a matter of time until the second vehicle is driverless.

If platooning becomes an industry standard in transportation, many questions about occupational hazards will have to be addressed. Will manual classification need to evolve to address drivers who are not actually driving? Will truck drivers’ salaries change and if so, how will that affect payroll and premiums for the transportation industry? And what are the unintended risks that may creep in as occupations change?

Just like most changes, there are many questions that we don’t have the answers to. And that’s ok. Right now it is just important that we stay alert and prepare for the rapid changes ahead.

Be sure to join the Underwriting Committee at the AASCIF Annual Conference for A Changing Workforce: Technology & Automation to hear about what changes other industries are experiencing.

Sources:
Kurt, Arda. "Autonomous Vehicles." Personal interview. 10 Feb. 2016. Center of Automotive Research at The Ohio State University

"Self-Driving Cars and Insurance." © Insurance Information Institute, Inc, July 2016. Web. 22 Feb. 2017.

McFarland, Matt. "When Truck Drivers Tailgating Is Actually a Good Thing." CNNMoney. Cable News Network, 16 Feb. 2017. Web. 22 Feb. 2017.

 

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